Over 1700 diapers available for needy families in St. Louis

How To Safely Diaper A Baby

Diaper need is a silent epidemic in the United States. According to a recent study by Huggies, one in three families are forced to choose between household necessities and diapers.

Diapers are one of the most expensive costs associated with raising a baby. No government assistance exists to help families in need with the cost of diapers. Diapers cannot be purchased with WIC or SNAP benefits. Yet, diapers are a basic necessity to keep a baby clean and dry. Without an adequate supply of disposable diapers parents resort to rationing by leaving them on babies longer and to drying soiled diapers to reuse them. This can lead to a heartbreaking array of problems such as rash and infection for babies and significant emotional stress for parents.

In response to this growing epidemic Cotton Babies, Inc., created Share the Love, a cloth diaper bank, which has since grown since 2012 to include 125 locations nationwide. Share the Love brings hope to struggling families by offering reusable cloth diaper loans to qualifying families.

Due to a recent influx of cloth diaper donations, the St. Louis locations of Share the Love have over 1700 diaper changes available for distribution. These donated diapers have the potential to save local families the purchase of nearly 400,000 disposable diapers this year alone. Parents can visit http://www.cottonbabieslove.com/need-diapers/ for information about applying for a cloth diaper loan from Share the Love.

For more information about the Share The Love cloth diaper bank and how you can help, please email sharethelove@cottonbabies.com.

Jenn is the Founder and CEO of Cotton Babies. She holds an Executive MBA from Washington University. She was awarded Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year award in the Emerging Category for the Central Midwest Region in 2011. Among many other awards, she recently received a 2017 YWCA Leader of Distinction Award for Entrepreneurship. Jenn holds many patents on various inventions in a number of different countries and is listed as one of 50 Missourians You Should Know. She is particularly fascinated by languages, chickens, and children (she has four) when she’s not reading economics journals.

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